Western Civilization Since 1650    (Spring 2011)

42. 126.04 (Tues-Thurs, 3:30) and 42.126.05 (Tues-Thurs, 12:30)

Professor:  M. Hickey    Office:  OSH 130  x-4161  mhickey@bloomu.edu 

Office hours:  T-Th, 2:00-3:15; Wed., 1:00-2:45 and 5:30-6:00.

Navigation links for this syllabus 

 

Link to Notes on the Russian Revolution/Soviet Union to 1939, for Quiz 5

Basic course information:

Explanations of graded course assignments:

 

Weekly Schedule    

___________

Course Introduction

Scope

This course surveys the history of Western Civilization from the 1600s to the late 1900s.  It concentrates on aspects of European history using case studies.  The course focuses on the following fundamental issues:    

         the development of the modern nation state

         the rise of modern science and its application to theories about society 

         the development of the modern capitalist economy, and in particular industrial capitalism 

         the evolution of modern concepts of politics and government

         the development of modern concepts of rights, and conflicts over who defines rights and who "gets" them

         the contexts for and worldviews associated with modern political movements--particularly, Liberalism, Conservativism, Nationalism, Anarchism, Socialism, Communism, and Fascism 

         methods modern states and other political actors use to mobilize and control (and destroy) populations 

 

Objectives

 

If you take your work in this course seriously, it will help you:

 

  1. Build a base of useful knowledge about aspects of modern history
  2. Apply critical thinking skills to understanding aspects of modern history
  3. Apply critical reading skills to understanding aspects of modern history
  4. Apply analytical writing skills to explain and interpret aspects of modern history

It is my hope that this course will help you "think historically"--in other words, that it will help you learn to use historical methods to ask questions about the past.  I am convinced that doing so can enrich your understanding of human cultures and societies in the past and in the present. 

 

Methods

 

There is a very heavy emphasis in this course on reading and writing.  The basic methods employed in this course will be: 

Assessment

 

 

 

Required Texts

 

The following books are required.  Buy them at the University Store or buy them on-line, but you must have these specific editions: 

 

Judith Coffin, et. al., Western Civilizations:  Their History and Their Culture, Volume 2.  16th Edition.  (New York:  Norton, 2008.)

 

H. G. Wells, The Time Machine.  Signet Classics Mass Market Edition.  (New York:  Penguin, 2002.)

 

 

 

Grade Components and Grade Scale

Your grade in this course is based upon: 

Course grade scale: 

 

Mandatory Verification that you have read the syllabus and are aware of course policies and procedures

 

You must read this syllabus and then sign a form verifying that you: a) have read this syllabus; b) are aware of course policies and procedures.    Follow this link to fill out the form:   Link to the "Verification Document" Form

 

If you have questions about the syllabus, course policies, or assignments, it is your responsibility to ask those questions (in class, or after class, or in my office hours, or by email).  It is my responsibility to answer those questions as clearly and directly as possible.  

 

I will not grade any of your quizzes, exams, or papers until you have verified that you have read the syllabus (etc).

 

Plagiarism Policy

This class has a  zero tolerance policy regarding plagiarism and all other forms of cheating. 

For the definitions of plagiarism and cheating that apply in this course, see this link on plagiarism.  

For the University's Academic Integrity Policy and an explanation of the appeals process regarding violations of academic integrity, see the online version of the  BU student handbook, The Pilot.  

If I determine that you have cheated or plagiarized on any assignment, I will strictly follow university guidelines: 

  1. You will receive a failing grade for the assignment

  2. I will file a formal report with BUís Student Standards Board.  This can lead to your academic dismissal.

  3. If you have cheated or plagiarized on more than one assignment, you will fail the entire course.

 

Attendance (Mandatory)

 

Your grade in the entire course will drop in direct proportion to your unexcused absences. 

 

Example:  Student X has 950 out of the 1000 possible points on graded assignments (an A).

                     Student X missed 20 percent of class sessions with unexcused absences

                     200 points will be deducted from Student X's course grade, which becomes 750 points (a C).

 

What are my minimal expectations?

 

Excused Absences, Late Assignments, and Make-Up Assignments 

Excused absences:  

A student misses class because of illness, a family emergency, or a University-related event, but has either:

a) informed the instructor in writing in advance, or

b) after the fact, provides the instructor with University-approved documentation excusing the absence. 

 

Late Assignments

Assignments are due on the date and at the time indicated in the syllabus. 

10 percent of the possible grade total will be deducted from the grade of a paper that is late, with an additional 10 percent deducted for each additional day that it is late. 

At the instructor's discretion, this policy may be waved in the case of medical or other emergencies. 

 

Make Up Assignments:

Missed quizzes, exams, etc., can be taken at a later date only if the assignment was missed due to an excused absence. 

In such cases, the make up quiz or exam will be administered at a time and place chosen by the instructor.

 

Graded Assignments:

Textbook Quizzes  (20 percent of course grade/200 possible points)

There will be five (5) quizzes on textbook reading assignments.  Each quiz will count for 4 percent of the course grade (40 points possible per quiz).

The quizzes may cover and and all material in the assigned readings, and many include text focus questions, questions on the documents (boxed in the text), and questions on key terms. 

The quizzes may use multiple choice, matching, fill in the blank, or short-answer format, or any combination of these.

Quizzes will be given at the beginning of class and will be "timed"; students who are late for class will not be granted extra time.

Grades on quizzes will be based on the accuracy of your answers.

 

Midterm Exam  (30 percent of course grade/300 possible points) (Date: 3 March)

On the date indicated in this syllabus, there will be an in-class midterm exam that covers all of the readings and lectures for the first seven weeks this course.     

The exam will be essay format, essays written in "blue books."

The possible essay questions will be announced at least one week in advance of the exam. 

Students are not permitted to use notes of any kind while taking the exam.  

Except in cases in which the instructor has consented to other arrangements, the exam will be given in the regular classroom during the regularly scheduled class period, and must be completed by the end of that class period.  Students who are late for the exam will not be given extra time.

For an answer to achieve a grade of "C" or higher, it must demonstrate command of evidence from the lectures and the assigned readings (both).

The exam grade will be based upon how well the essay satisfies the following requirements: 

 

Final Exam  (30 percent of course grade/300 possible points) (Date:  4 May)

On the date indicated in this syllabus, there will be a final term exam that covers all of the readings and lectures for the last seven weeks of this course.     

The exam will be essay format, essays written in "blue books."

The possible essay questions will be announced at least one week in advance of the exam. 

Students are not permitted to use notes of any kind while taking the exam.  

Except in cases in which the instructor has consented to other arrangements, the exam will be given in the regular classroom during the regularly scheduled final exam period, and must be completed by the end of that period.  Students who are late for the exam will not be given extra time.

For an answer to achieve a grade of "C" or higher, it must demonstrate command of evidence from the lectures and the assigned readings (both).

The exam grade will be based upon how well the essay satisfies the following requirements: 

 

Paper on H. G. Wells, The Time Machine (20 percent of course grade; 200 possible points) (Due date:  7 April)

Students will read the specific assigned edition of Wells' The Time Machine and write a 3-4 page paper that answers this question:

Based on the views expressed by the narrator ("the time traveler"), in what ways did did H. G. Wells' novel The Time Machine reflect significant contemporary (late 19th century) social theories?  For example, in what ways does his narrator seem to be influenced by "social Darwinism"?  In what ways does his narrator seem to be influenced by socialist views about social class and the economy?   What other contemporary (late 19th century) social theories might the book reflect, and why?

To answer this question adequately, you must:

Format:  Typed, double spaced, in Times Roman 12 point font.   1 inch margins.  No cover page.  Name at top left of page 1.  Page numbers top right.

The paper grade will be based upon how well the essay satisfies the following requirements: 

Warning:  This assignment is to be based entirely on materials assigned for this course, including the specific assigned edition of the Wells novel.  Students who base any or all portions of their papers on web-based sources, cliff notes or other summaries of the book, encyclopedias, etc. will fail the assignment.  Students plagiarizing any portion of this assignment (from a web site, the work of another student, etc.) will fail the assignment and the course.

 

TIPS ON STUDYING FOR QUIZZES AND EXAMS:

Taking notes on reading assignments.

 

In general: 

To study for quizzes on the Coffin textbook:

Taking notes in class:

 

Preparing for exams:

 

 

 

Weekly schedule: 

This is a provisional schedule.  I may find it necessary to change the dates of some assignments during the semester, and I may at times run a bit ahead or behind the syllabus.

 

Week I:  T., 18 Jan.; Th., 20 Jan.

Introduction to the Course; The Diversity of 17th Century European Civilizations; The State in Early Modern Europe

Readings:  Coffin, Introduction to Part V (pp. 534-537) and all of Chapter 15.

                                                                       

Week II:  T., 25 Jan.; Th. 27 Jan.

The State in Early Modern Europe/ The Scientific Revolution

Readings:  Coffin, Chapter 15 (review) and all of Chapter 16

                                                
Week III:  T., 1 Feb.; Th., 3 Feb.

Science and the Enlightenment

Readings:  Coffin, Chapter 16 (review) and all of Chapter 17

QUIZ 1 this week on Coffin, chapters 15-17

 

Week IV:  T., 8 Feb.; Th., 10 Feb.

Early Modern European Society/ The French Revolution

Readings:  Coffin, Chapter 17 (review) and all of Chapter 18

 

Week V:  T., 15 Feb.; Th., 17 Feb.

The French Revolution and the Napoleonic Era

Readings:   Coffin, chapter 18 (review), Chapter 19 (pre-read)

 

Week VI:  T., 22 Feb.; Th., 24 Feb.

Post-Revolutionary Politics and Society, 1815-1847

Readings: Coffin, Chapter 19 (pre-read) and all of Chapter 20

QUIZ 2 this week on Coffin, Chapters 17-20.

 

Week VII:  T., 1 March; Th., 3 March

The Industrial Revolution and Social Change/  Midterm Exam THURSDAY

Readings:  Coffin, Chapter 19 (re-read)

                                                                               

Week VIII:  Spring Break  (no class on 8, 10 March)

 

Week IX:  T., 15 March; Th., 17 March

The Revolutions of 1848

Readings:  Coffin, Chapter 20 (review the section "Reform and Revolution"; Chapter 21 (section on "Nationalism and Revolution in 1848"); the rest of Chapter 21 (pre-read)

 

Week X:  T., 22 March; Th., 24 March

Mass Politics and Mass Society, 1850-1914  

Readings:  Coffin, all of Chapter 21 and all of Chapter 23; if you have not already, you should begin reading the Wells novel.

QUIZ 3 this week on Coffin, chapters 21 and chapter 23.

Pay special attention to the study questions in chapter 21 on "nationalism  and the revolutions of 1848" and on "national unification in Italy and Germany"; pay special attention in chapter 23 to the study questions on "mass politics" and "the impact of new scientific theories on culture." 

 

Week XI:  T., 29 March; Th., 31 March

 Imperialism, 1870-1914

Readings:  Coffin, all of Chapter 22; you must finish reading the Wells novel this week.

 

Week XII: T., 5 April; Th., 7 April

World War One

Readings:  Coffin, Chapter 24.

Paper on H. G. Wells' The Time Machine due in class on Thursday.

 

Week XIII:  T., 12 April; Th., 14 April

The Russian Revolution

Readings:  Coffin, Chapter 24 (review); Chapter 25 (pre-read)

QUIZ 4 this week on Coffin, chapters 23-24                 

 

Week XIV:  T., 19 April; Th., 21 April

Fascism and Nazism

Readings:  Coffin, all of Chapter 25; chapter 26 (pre-read)

 

Week XV:  T., 26 April; Th., 28 April

World War Two and the immediate post-war era

Readings:  Coffin, all of Chapter 26, all of Chapter 27

QUIZ 5 this week, on linked lecture ntes about Russian Revolution/Sviet Union to 1939

_______________

Week XVI:  Final exam week = 2 May-6 May

Final exams:  Section 4:   Weds., 4 May at 12:30 in our classroom

                       Section 5:   Weds., 4 May at 10:15 in our classroom