Summer Field School in Archaeology
Summer Excursions to Mexico
The Migrant Community Project
Internship Announcement
Latin American Studies Minor
Anthropology Club
Lambda Alpha
SSHE Undergraduate Anthropology Conference
 

  Summer Field School in Archaeology

Every other year, the Department of Anthropology offers a six week archaeological field school during the summer session. Under the direction of Dr. Wymer, the field school offers instruction in survey and laboratory techniques in archaeology as well as actual field excavation. In 1996, the field school was held at the Streater Site in Bloomsburg. Located along the Susquehanna River, this site provided evidence of continuous habitation by Native Americans in what were probably seasonal camps over hundreds of years. Artifacts recovered included projectile points, sinker weights (for nets for fishing), and numerous stone flakes. Radiocarbon material from the Streater site produced dates over 9,000 years old. In 1999, the fieldschool took place at the Zehner site, a late prehistoric village located approximately 15 miles east of the university and along the Susquehanna River. Students uncovered traces of houses, firepits, broken ceramics, arrowpoints, and burned corn kernels.

In previous years, the field school was held at Native American ceremonial or village sites in Ohio. The field school is available for 3 or 6 credits (see 46.301, Field Archaeology, in the course listings) and meets the requirement in the anthropology major for a field experience or hands-on experiential course. Internships are also available following field schools for students who wish to learn more about cataloging and analyzing artifacts in a laboratory setting.

    

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Summer Excursions to Mexico

In 1991,1995, and 1998, Dr. Aleto escorted students to Mexico for two weeks to visit major archaeological, historical, and cultural sites. The last two trips concentrated on Mexico City and the Valley of Oaxaca. Among the sites visited were the Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City, the Aztec Temple Major, the prehistoric city of Teotihuacan, the archaeological sites of Monte Alban and Mitla in Oaxaca, and many other points of interests including markets, cathedrals, and historical sites. The tour has also featured visits to the homes of Mexican artisans, especially rug weavers and wood carvers in Oaxaca. The Mexico trip is also available for course credit (see 46.497, Internship in Anthropology, in the course listings) and meets the requirement in the anthropology major for a field experience.

In the past (1977-1987), the Department of Anthropology also sponsored summer tours of the American Southwest. These tours also looked at archaeological and historical sites as well as the natural wonders of the Southwest, such as the Grand Canyon. Among the sites visited on previous Southwest tours were Mesa Verde, Canyon du Chelly, Chaco Canyon, Casa Grande, the Heard Museum in Phoenix, and the Navaho, Hopi, and Papago reservations.

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The Migrant Community Project

The Department of Anthropology is currently involved in a project with the Departments of History and Secondary Education, as well as the S.O.L.V.E. office of Volunteer Services, to provide services to labor migrants in the Bloomsburg area. The project will provide labor migrants with health information and services, interpreters, conflict resolution and mediation, and tutoring in reading and writing skills. Internship opportunities and research grants are available for students who want to work with culturally diverse populations. Students working in the project will assist local school districts with tutoring in reading, writing, science, math, and social studies; work with children in Head Start programs; teach English as a second language; assist in translations where migrants come in contact with local, state, and federal agencies; and provide health care education. Dr. Dauria is the contact person in the Department of Anthropology for the Migrant Community Project.

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Internship Announcement:

In Summer 1998 and 1999, there were several paid internship positions for students who would like experience as migrant outreach workers or educational outreach workers. This will continue in 2000.

These positions require the student to have transportation since the jobs will require the outreach workers to transport migrants to health care providers and educational facilities.

These internship opportunities are part of the Rural Community Outreach Project (formerly the Migrant Community Project) which is a collaborative effort of several departments at Bloomsburg University.

The project strives to connect community needs with university personnel who can provide services. Not only does this project render services to needy populations, but students can also cultivate valuable educational experiences outside the classroom. Students majoring in Spanish, anthropology, history, nursing, biology, or education could benefit tremendously from experience with these populations.

If you are interested in an internship in the Rural Community Outreach Project, please contact Dr. Susan Dauria in G09 Old Science Hall or at 389-4952 (x4952).

The Anthropology Department encourages our students to acquire hands-on experience, and internships are an excellent vehicle to gain this experience. Each faculty member in the department can be approached to create and facilitate internships that are appropriate for students' interests and needs. Dr. Wymer, for example, has created internships with a number of regional contract archaeology companies and local museums and historical societies for students interested in archaeology and museum studies. Dr. Warner has taken students with her to study in Mayan villages during the summer, as well as facilitated internships in cultural anthropology in the local area.

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Latin American Studies Minor

Bloomsburg University offers a Latin American Studies Minor which is administered jointly by the Departments of Anthropology and Languages & Cultures. The minor includes a set of courses in anthropology, languages, and history that gives students a background in Latin America. The Latin American Studies Minor could be used with a major in anthropology to increase a student's chances for employment or admission to graduate school. Dr. Dauria is the contact person in the Department of Anthropology for this program.

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Anthropology Club

The Department of Anthropology sponsors an undergraduate anthropology club. Membership is open to any student interested in anthropology; there are no club dues. The club meets bi-weekly and sponsors programs of all kinds. In the past, the club has sponsored a tour of the Olmec exhibit at Princeton University, talks and slide shows by several faculty, the annual Fall Festival, participation in Native American Pow Wows, and student attendance at the American Anthropological Association's Annual Meeting and the SSHE Undergraduate Anthropology Conferences. The club also sponsors an annual t-shirt competition to determine the design for each year's club shirt. The leader for the club for 2002-2003 is Jonathan Rhodes, and the faculty adviser is Dr Minderhout.

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Lambda Alpha

Beginning in 1996, the Department of Anthropology became a member of Lambda Alpha, the national honorary society for anthropology students. Anthropology students become eligible for membership when they achieve junior status, have had a minimum of 12 credits in anthropology, and have maintained a minimum of a 3.2 in their anthropology classes. Students elected to the honors society, pay a one time due of $25 which entitles them to a membership wall certificate and a one-year subscription to the society's newsletter. Lambda Alpha sponsors a nationwide scholarship competition each year for students who would like to attend graduate school. There is an awards luncheon hosted by the Anthropology Dept. to honor the BU Lambda Alpha students and the Anthropology Student of the Year at the end of the spring semester each year. The faculty advisor is Dr. Warner.

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SSHE Undergraduate Anthropology Conference

Each year in the spring, the State System of Higher Education sponsors a conference for undergraduate anthropology students. At the conference, students present their research in a professional setting. BU's Department of Anthropology has been a participating member of this conference and has in fact twice sponsored the conference on campus since the conference's inception in 1989. Each year, several BU students present their research at the conference. Students present papers based on their participation in the summer field school in archaeology, internships, the Field Methods in Cultural Anthropology class (46.475), or other classes. Several other SSHE universities regularly participate, including Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Millersville, Shippensburg, Edinboro, Mansfield, and California University of Pennsylvania. Presentations at the conference are excellent preparation for graduate school.

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